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What's Your Biggest Challenge with Your Book?

I'd be interested to learn what authors/publishers on this network think their biggest challenges are with their book. I wonder if there's any common, pervasive challenge we all face.

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Edd,

Well, it was good for you to try. Most of the stuff I try initially doesn't work out, or I find myself doing a lot of tweeking. I would consider locally owned restaurants. They can generally make quick decisions without going through lots of hoops.

Edd . . . Offer to contribute some content to some of the top trucking websites, ones that accept contributions from outside. Share some of the stories from your previous book, if nothing else. Then link to that book as well as your new book.

Often, when we have two books, we can use the older book to promote the newer book. Any of your trucking stories should be welcome on those trucking websites.

John Kremer, author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books

webmaster at http://www.asksjohnkremer.com and http://www.bookmarket.com

Bill,

As a first-time novelist, my biggest challenge with my book is getting a publisher to READ it. I'm working diligently to establish an online presence and I'm satisfied (although I do make changes sometimes) with the query letter and synopsis that I've written. I've worked on Mixed Messages, a women's mystery/suspense novel, for years through more drafts/rewrites than I can count (I'm not all that good in math) and I've actually completed the second novel, Unfinished Business, for my series. Now, if only a publisher would actually read my novel and make a decision based on the book!

Hello Patricia,


Would you ever consider self-publishing to CreateSpace or Lulu rather than waiting for a publisher to pick it up? It is such a waste of time, when you spent so much effort writing it but not given the chance to be published.

 

Just my thoughts.

 

 

Jeny

www.thefastfingers.com

Jeny,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts with me. Of course, self-publishing is an option but I'm still hopeful (I'm an optimistic realist) that I'll find the right publisher for my novels. I'm sending out lots of queries and I'm going to set a time limit for finding a publisher. I'm an outgoing person, not shy about marketing my work so, whichever way it goes, I know that "Mixed Messages" will see print.

Please visit my writers forum at:

http://pat-writersforum.blogspot.com/

Jeny,

The reason some people self publish and don't go through the years of agent rejections without knowing why is that they can self publish and have the satisfaction of being an author even if they only sell 200 to 400 copies to friends, family and a few who hit their website. Just as important is the fact that they can begin writing their second book or third and improving their craft along the way. I have a friend who wrote a very good book and has spent the last five years promoting it, even appearng on some  well known TV and radio shows. Promotional costs have her at a loss position.

In the meantime I have written six books four are novels and I am in editing on the seventh. I wouldn't give up the fun of writing those seven books for a few minutes a publisher sets up on a TV show. Cost wise I'm a little better off than my friend with one book.

 

Steve Roberts

steverroberts.com

 

 

Through the years, there have been many hurdles for me to overcome as a writer. Transitioning from short story writer to novelist was definitely one of them as was accepting the "new world" of publishing and all that it entails.

As a first time novelist, the biggest challenge I face now is finding a publisher for Mixed Messages, an 80,000 word women's mystery/suspense novel. It isn't easy breaking into the field but I'm working diligently to market my book, the first in a series.

My biggest challenge? Marketing my new book of course! It took me time and enormous pleasure to write, but now I find it hard to do the marketing myself. And this is the only option I have.

The most important thing you can do is to create relationships with the top websites your potential readers are already going to in order to find good books to read.

John

John,

Your comments are always helpful and right on the mark. Thanks.

What process do you recommend for identifying these websites and creating

relationships with their readers?

 

Steve Roberts

www.steverroberts.com

Right now just getting reviews is becoming a major problem. Working 7days a week doesn't help. I wish that I could quit the trucking to do the writing but it is the trucking that is paying the bills.

 

Hi Folks,

 

I'm the self-published author of The Budget of Your Life: Breaking the Chains of Debt which is a keen little book covering the principles of budgeting and spending well.The book is available on Amazon, and sales have been lukewarm. But I think the book is GREAT!

 

I am just starting to get into the marketing piece, for many of the reasons others listed in this thread. Mainly, I have a demanding day job; but it pays well.

 

That being said, I'm at a crossroads. I'm able to do a good deal of marketing myself; getting reviews, utilizing some of the great ideas listed in this thread, etc. I Tweet, MySpace and Facebook, and have a pretty decent online following.

 

I have the opportunity to hire a professional marketer to help me to expand, to broaden, and to handle some of the leg work. This marketer has some average credentials (they have marketed for restaurants and other nice businesses) and I've worked with them on other writing projects. They are a fine writer in their own right. Their fee is not expensive to me (with the well-paying day job) but I can tell you it is over $1,000 per month. We plan on a 3-month initial marketing campaign.

 

I know that sounds like a lot of money, but it is definitely within my means. My target goal is to sell 1,000 copies per month, at a price point of $4.99 (Kindle) and $9.99 (trade).

 

My question is this. Have any of you ever tried just hiring a marketing firm to help? It seems like an investment just like any other business. You open a Dunkin' Donuts, you have to invest some money.

 

Any thoughts on this? Am I making a big mistake? I haven't signed a contract, but they are working up a marketing plan this week.

 

Thanks in advance!

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